Pragmatic idealist. Worked on Ubuntu Phone. Inkscape co-founder. Probably human.
1042 stories
·
9 followers

Photographer hit by Olympic skier Lara Gut during wipeout

1 Comment

Embed from Getty Images

Swiss Olympic skier Lara Gut crashed during a run last week, and slid directly into a group of sports photographers on the sidelines. While most of them were able to get out of her way in time, one photographer, Sean Haffey, was hit square on. Fortunately, Haffey was quick with his camera and managed to capture multiple excellent shots of Gut as she slid toward him (embedded above).

Neither individual was hurt, but the collision, which was caught on video, still looks pretty intense:

According to Reuters, the crash may have happened due to one of Gut's skis hitting a gate. She lightheartedly said to reporters after the incident, "No, I‘m OK, I‘m OK. I asked the photographer if he was OK too and he said he was. I think it’s getting scary to be a photographer on skiing hills."

As for Haffey, Getty told NBC that he and his gear are both fine. "Sean is all OK as is his gear," said Director and Head of External Communications for Getty Images, Anne Flanagan. "Like a true professional, he was shooting the entire time."

Read the whole story
tedgould
3 days ago
reply
The dude shot pictures as he was getting hit by a skier. That is hardcore.
Texas, USA
Share this story
Delete

webshit weekly

1 Comment and 2 Shares

An annotated digest of the top "Hacker" "News" posts for the third week of February, 2018.

Why I don't use my real photo when messaging with customers on my website
February 15, 2018 (comments)
A webshit discovers that the internet is full of trash. Several Hackernews claim that women would be treated more respectfully by strangers if women could pass a Turing test. Several more claim that women would be treated more respectfully if they stopped trying to help their customers. One Hackernews is angry that random passersby don't respond positively to catcalls. Another can't understand how repeated requests for photographs of sex organs can possibly constitute abuse. The rest of the comments are people explaining that it's okay to type sexual harassment into message popups.

OpenStreetMap Is in Trouble
February 16, 2018 (comments)
An Internet bemoans the state of a website devoted to bikeshedding maps. Hackernews can't decide if there is a user interface problem or a fundamental design failure. The founder of the website in question arrives to inform the world that nobody needs maps any more because of self-driving cars. Hackernews spends a while debating whether Google Maps (from Google) or Waze (from Google) is the right answer.

MacOS may lose data on APFS-formatted disk images
February 17, 2018 (comments)
Apple continues its war against its own users. Some Hackernews express mild concern, but an army of partisan Mac users organize patrols to interrogate nonbelievers. Any suboptimal behavior of an Apple product, decrees Hackernews, is the fault of the idiot user, who clicked the wrong button or downloaded the wrong third-party disk molestation utility from the App Store. Anyway it can't be Apple's fault because filesystems are really hard and nobody has ever written one that works.

Working remotely, 4 years in
February 18, 2018 (comments)
An Internet never shows up for work. Neither does Hackernews. Nobody notices.

Maybe you don't need Rust and WASM to speed up your JS
February 19, 2018 (comments)
A webshit vomits forth thousands of words of utterly useless garbage. Utterly useless garbage being Hackernews' stock in trade, they spend several hours bikeshedding the webshit's pointless results. The Rust Evangelism Strike Force is on hand to dispatch suppressive persons to the Mozilla Re-education Camps.

JupyterLab is ready for users
February 20, 2018 (comments)
Unsatisfied with having built an entire operating system based around the Python REPL, the IPython people have picked a dumber name, added more scripting languages, and shoved themselves into a massive webshit casserole. A Hackernews declares intent to use this software, and is immediately dogpiled with lectures about the Right Way to Do Things. Some Hackernews complain that they love the "shove everything onto the screen at once" school of program design, but wish for a world in which code and data could ever be extricated. One Hackernews asks what the hell, exactly, this program in fact does. Nobody answers.

Signal Foundation
February 21, 2018 (comments)
Someone gave Moxie more money. Hackernews has ideas on how to spend it. No improvements in any Signal-related products are announced. The Cash Source talks about "universal availability" when referring to a program that only works on two kinds of cellular phone. The XMPP Memorial Society files into a side room to trade war stories about the last chat protocol that Changed the World.

Read the whole story
tedgould
3 days ago
reply
Ouch, "The XMPP Memorial Society" is so true it hurts. I miss XMPP.
Texas, USA
Share this story
Delete

Austin has mandated paid sick leave for workers, but Texas lawmakers are already working to reverse it

1 Comment

The Austin City Council on Friday approved a new rule requiring businesses in the city to provide paid sick leave for employees, but movement is already afoot in the Texas Legislature to kill the ordinance. 

At a meeting where over 200 people came to testify — a majority of them supporting the ordinance — the council voted 9-2 to implement the policy. But hours after the rule was passed, state Rep. Paul Workman, R-Austin, sounded off against the bill, saying the ordinance is “declaring war” on small private businesses.

“It’s not the role of the government to mandate for employers to do this," Workman said. 

The new rule mandated that private employers allow their workers to accrue up to 64 hours, or eight days, of paid sick leave per year. Small businesses with 15 or fewer employees could have paid sick days up to 48 hours, or six work days. The passed ordinance is scheduled to go into effect on Oct. 1, making Austin the first Texas city to pass a paid sick-day ordinance.

But Workman said he has already talked to a number of lawmakers in both the House and the Senate who will support legislation overturning the ordinance in the next session.

“I will make good on my promise to file legislation on the first day possible to reverse this and the other liberal Austin policies they enacted,” Workman said.

State Sen. Donna Campbell, R-New Braunfels, also expressed opposition to the ordinance on Twitter,  saying she is “fully prepared to pass statewide legislation to stop Austin's intrusion into the private sector and protect small businesses in Texas.”

Those statements set the stage for the next fight over local control in the Texas Capitol. The conservative state government and the more liberal big cities have been at odds in recent years over issues like plastic bag bans, ordinances regulating who can cut down certain trees and regulations for ride-sharing and taxi companies. Conservative lawmakers have attempted to strike down a lot of those regulations, saying they are protecting residents from overly obtrusive regulation. Local governments say they are in the best position to determine what's best for their cities. 

The author of the ordinance, Councilman Greg Casar said it was “disappointing” to see how lawmakers like Workman are already planning to override the ordinance in the next session.

“I believe that by not standing up for workers because we are scared of the Legislature then we’re just being complicit,” Casar said. “We’ll just fight them tooth and nail at the Legislature."

Apart from legislators, some Texas business owners also opposed the rule. Skeeter Miller, owner and president of the County Line barbecue restaurant said city’s overreach into private businesses like his own are “disappointing,” particularly when there’s no input from businesses like his that will be economically impacted by the mandate.

"This ordinance came up and there was no business input — the business community was not apart of this,” Miller said. “One-size-fits-all policy doesn’t work.”

Microbusinesses, or businesses with five or fewer employees, were not exempted from the approved ordinance, but won’t be required to give paid sick leave until October 2020. An attempt by Councilwoman Allison Atler to exempt all non-profit employers until Oct. 2019 did not pass, according to the Austin-American Statesman

“The fact of the matter is basic protections for working Texas families are essential to making sure that we have an economy that works for everyone,” Casar said. “When all of us do better, all of us do better.”

Read the whole story
tedgould
8 days ago
reply
I support required sick leave. I get confused when conservative politicians at the state level try to impose on cities instead of relying on markets and elections to handle equalization of values.
Texas, USA
Share this story
Delete

We recommend Greg Abbott in the GOP primary for Texas governor

1 Comment
Read the whole story
tedgould
8 days ago
reply
While I'm not a big fan of Abbott, when looking at who he's running against you have to agree "Abbott is the only responsible choice."
Texas, USA
Share this story
Delete

Why are the Obama portraits so different from typical presidential portraits?

1 Comment
Read the whole story
tedgould
8 days ago
reply
Still undecided on the portraits themselves, but I found this interview interesting to learn about the artists and the styles.
Texas, USA
Share this story
Delete

Goals on the Ice and Politics in the Air as Japan Beats Unified Korean Team

1 Comment
In what has been an Olympics rife with geopolitical undertones, the hockey game between Japan and Korea was the most political of all.

Read the whole story
tedgould
10 days ago
reply
I feel like women's sport has really made it now that it can have "geopolitical undertones."
Texas, USA
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories