Pragmatic idealist. Worked on Ubuntu Phone. Inkscape co-founder. Probably human.
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New People

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New People

Speaking of meeting new people, I’ll be meeting loads of new people at the Vancouver Fan Expo this weekend. Here are the details!

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tedgould
1 day ago
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Not saying this is the only reason I like new people coming to WoFLFri at TheLab.ms, but it is a good reason.
Texas, USA
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The Science of Pumpkins

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If you ask any of our teaching staff what program they have taught the most during their time in the education department, Pumpkin Circle is certainly at the top of their list.

This classroom lab program has been around for years – and its popularity only continues to increase. In fact, we typically book both of our classroom spaces for the entire Autumn at the Arboretum before the first week of the festival ends, and the majority of the programs are Pumpkin Circle.

For the first time this year we’ve also added a homeschool pumpkin program, Science of Pumpkins, which hosted over 180 students and parents this past week. It’s hard not to be pumpkin obsessed when we have 90,000 in the garden.

Many teachers use pumpkins in their school classroom to teach about the parts of a plant or the plant life cycle (just like our classroom lab), but that is just the beginning. In this month’s blog, I’d like to share a variety of other ways to teach science and math concepts using pumpkins.

Explore the Senses

Pumpkins offer an excellent opportunity for young learners to practice making observations with all of their senses, an activity that can be used across the hallway in your language arts classes, too!

Here are a few sample lessons:

Pre-K Pages Pumpkin Science Exploration

Pumpkin Sensory Play

Pumpkin Science with the Five Senses

Explore Math and Measurement

Pumpkins provide ample opportunities for practicing math and measurement skills. The obvious activity is counting seeds! Does the size of the pumpkin determine how many seeds it contains on average? Does the mass? Or the variety?

Students are also expected to use nonstandard units of measure. Some student investigation questions include:

  • How many pumpkins tall am I?
  • How many pumpkin seeds long is the table?
  • How many acorns fit in a pumpkin?

You can also explore geometry by creating a pumpkin geoboard. What shapes can students generate? Can you use it to show fractions?

Explore Other Science Concepts

There are a plethora of pumpkin-themed science lessons; here are a few more of our favorites:

Do you remember the watermelon rubber band challenge that took social media by storm a few years back? Well, you can do it with pumpkins, too! (With appropriate safety gear in place, please.)

Do you have a favorite science-themed pumpkin activity not listed here? We’d love to hear from you at education@dallasarboretum.org – and it might just make it on the blog!

Dustin Miller
Director of Education

The post The Science of Pumpkins appeared first on Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden Blog.

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tedgould
5 days ago
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We love going as a family to see the pumpkins at the Arboretum every October. Here are some fun educational things to do with pumpkins (and other squash).
Texas, USA
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Texas' latest Nobel winner says there's a simple thing we need to do to keep winning the prize

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tedgould
5 days ago
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"When politicians talk of cutting funding to the National Institutes of Health and other funders of basic research, they are not 'draining the swamp' but strangling the goose that lays the golden egg."
Texas, USA
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Army Corps set to propose hurricane protection plan for Houston

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A "coastal spine," also called the Ike Dike, pictured here, is among several storm barrier concepts the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers may recommend for the Houston area.
A "coastal spine," also called the Ike Dike, pictured here, is among several storm barrier concepts the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers may recommend for the Houston area. Graphic by Todd Wiseman

Later this month, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will recommend a multi-billion-dollar plan to help protect the Texas coast — the Houston area in particular — from hurricanes. When it will become a reality, however, is anyone’s guess.

The more than 200-year-old agency — in partnership with the Texas General Land Office — embarked on the largest study in its history in 2014 to determine how best to guard the Bayou City and other coastal communities from devastating storm surge.

Four years later, the agency has devised four proposals for the Houston area; it will announce which one it thinks is best on Oct. 26 and open a 75-day public comment period, according to Kelly Burks-Copes, a project manager at the Army Corps’ Galveston District.

The plans are distinctly different — one of them has an alternate variation — but all include a mixture of new levees, improvements to existing levees and seawalls and the installation of so-called “navigation” gates, which would be closed ahead of storms to protect densely populated areas southeast of Houston and the city’s port — home to the largest refining and petrochemical complex in the nation, which saw significant flooding during Hurricane Harvey — from the deadly swells generated by a hurricane’s strong winds. That storm surge can result in major flooding even before a storm makes landfall.

One of the plans calls for the construction of a 17-foot-high levee along the entirety of Galveston Island, which is about 27 miles long, and the barrier island to its north, Bolivar Peninsula — a concept that has been dubbed the “coastal spine.” Another includes a levee through most of Bolivar but not Galveston. Others call for the construction of new levees and floodwalls further inland. All the plans include the installation of navigation gates in various places and the construction of a so-called “ring levee” around the heart of the Galveston that would protect the island’s backside from retreating storm surge.

As promised, some of the Army Corps’ proposals borrow from dueling storm surge protection plans that scientists at Texas A&M at Galveston and Rice universities unveiled years ago, shortly after Hurricane Ike in 2008. (A&M’s plan calls for a coastal spine, often referred to as the Ike Dike; Rice’s for a massive navigation gate.) Those researchers have consistently warned that Ike — already one of the costliest storms in U.S. history — could have sent a crippling storm surge into coastal communities and the port if it hadn’t shifted at the last minute. The quasi-governmental Gulf Coast Community Protection and Recovery District — a six-county coalition formed in the wake of Ike to study storm protection strategies for the upper Texas coast — also recommended a coastal spine-style plan in June 2016.

“We have regularly engaged with the GCCPRD, Texas A&M, and Rice as our study has progressed, and have folded their designs, data, and analysis into our study,” Burks-Copes said.

The Army Corps also has suggested six other projects to restore ecosystems across the Texas coast that act as natural barriers to storm surge.

The “tentatively selected plan” the Army Corps will announce later this month will include one of the four Houston-specific protection plans and one of the six ecosystem restoration projects.

The Army Corps estimates that the cost of the recommended plan will range between $22 billion and $30 billion. The Houston-area barrier may cost as much as $17 billion with the rest going toward ecosystem restoration projects.

Members of the public — even those living outside Texas — will have until Jan. 9 to weigh in on the Army Corps’ chosen plan. Six public meetings are in the works, although the Army Corps also plans to take feedback online and via mail. Three meetings will be held in the Houston-Galveston area, the others in communities further down the coast that would be impacted by the ecosystem restorations projects.

The Army Corps may tweak the plan based on public feedback, Burks-Copes said. The final version is expected to be complete by 2021, when it will be eligible for funding by Congress.

How soon that could happen is anyone’s guess given the uncertainty of politics, though several members of Texas’ congressional delegation — including Sen. John Cornyn, a Republican — have championed the cause.

In July, the administration announced that Texas would receive more than $5 billion for a range of flood control projects and studies, including $1.9 million for the Army Corps-General Land Office study. The bulk of the funding — nearly $4 billion — will go toward the construction of nearly 27 miles of coastal levees in southern Orange County and to shore up nearly 30 miles of existing coastal levees in Port Arthur and Freeport.

Burks-Copes said the plan is being likened to the mega-project that built a series of dams along the Mississippi River, “and that took more than 50 years to complete.”

“If we don’t get all the money we need, we have to separate pieces and parts out and build them as separable elements,” she said.

“If it was a perfect world,” she added, construction would begin in 2025 and conclude in 2035.

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tedgould
11 days ago
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Reminds me how a friend who worked on Climate Change policy talk about rich nations being able to adapt to the effects while the devastation would largely occur in the developing world.
Texas, USA
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m_melgrati

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Too Smart? - For Washington Post.About smart home technology, and the increasing of smart phone app usage. How much we are willing to trade our confort in exchange of our privacy? Thanks to AD @vickyadamsfogg Write by Sonia Rao #eye #look #spy #data #media #social #app #privacy #smart #dangerous #phone #modern #times #iphone #home #window #lady #hairs #back #head #drawing #distopia #conceptual #minimalism #figure #drawing #washington #post @simply.cool.design @graphicdesigncentral @delightgraphics @artselect @artfido @art_spotlight @artmadnessmag @artselects @artinstic @boredpanda @dailyart @societyfeelings @picame @gfx.mob @designarf
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tedgould
11 days ago
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Powerful illustration of how our smart devices erode our privacy
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Here’s what Texas voters should know for the 2018 midterms

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Here’s everything you need to know about casting a ballot in Texas’ 2018 midterm elections. [ Read more ]

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tedgould
11 days ago
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For Texans, here is a breakdown of what districts you're in based on your address and who is running for what in those districts.
Texas, USA
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