Pragmatic idealist. Worked on Ubuntu Phone. Inkscape co-founder. Probably human.
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Apple Halves Its App Store Fee for the Smaller Companies

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App makers bridled at the 30 percent commission, which has drawn scrutiny from regulators looking into antitrust claims.
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tedgould
10 days ago
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The flat tax people are gonna be upset as the Apple tax becomes progressive.
Texas, USA
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When a Leader Just Won’t Go

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Wisdom from Shakespeare to Dickens to ‘Seinfeld’ on President Trump’s long non-goodbye.
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tedgould
12 days ago
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Enjoyed the examples of leaders, both fictional and historical, that refused to admit they lost elections and move on.
Texas, USA
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iFixit discovers camera repairs for iPhone 12 models can't be done by third-parties

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Repair site iFixit has discovered that repairing the cameras inside Apple’s new iPhone 12 smartphones will not be able to be, at least easily, done by third parties, as removing the cameras requires access to a proprietary tool that only authorized Apple technicians will have access to.

While trying to swap the camera modules inside two iPhone 12 devices, iFixit suspected something was up. After ‘exhaustive testing, comparing notes with multiple repair technicians, and reviewing leaked Apple training documents,’ iFixit discovered ‘the iPhone 12 camera is entirely unreliable when swapped between iPhones.’

Image credit: iFixit

Below is a video from YouTuber Taylor Dixon, who also discovered this while attempting to swap cameras inside iPhone 12 devices:

This, of course, means any DIY fixes or even those by unauthorized third-party phone repair shops won’t be happening. The graphic below is a leaked chart from Apple that shows iPhone 12 models require an authorized technician to run ‘System Configuration’ to replace a camera module (or a display). Previously, these limitations were only in place for batteries.

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tedgould
25 days ago
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Apple: "We care about the environment!"
Also Apple: "We software locked your phone so you can't repair it and have to buy a new one."
Texas, USA
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webshit weekly

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An annotated digest of the top "Hacker" "News" posts for the last week of October, 2020.

I reverse engineered McDonalds’ internal API
October 22, 2020 (comments)
An investigative journalist unveils the truth. Hackernews incorrects one another on fast food technology, then speculates about how to add more computers to improve the situation.

YouTube-dl has received a DMCA takedown from RIAA
October 23, 2020 (comments)
The RIAA causes outrage and fury worldwide by listing Icona Pop in the same set as Justin Timberlake and Taylor Swift. Hackernews wrestles with their value judgments; their firm stance as bootlickers for megacorporations has finally crashed headlong into their equally firm belief that programmers should never be held to any legal or moral standards. What results is a wide-ranging display of profound confusion, as Hackernews realizes they don't have clear definitions of literally any of the words involved in internet video, copyright law, the American legal process, or website hosting.

I am an Uighur who faced China’s concentration camps
October 24, 2020 (comments)
The Chinese government continues its war against literally everyone. Hackernews suggests withholding a small amount of money as a suitable punishment for genocide, but other Hackernews sternly insist that the only correct response is withholding a larger amount of money. Facing up to the fact that the Chinese government is unrepentantly evil at a massive scale proves to be too difficult for Hackernews, so the return to their accustomed base state by whatabouting other countries instead. At some point, for some reason, Hackernews starts arguing about Trump, because although America is apparently no better than the Chinese government, it's still evidently expected that America will have to fix it. The spectre of such a horrific intervention, which would almost certainly lead to war at an unspeakable level of ferocity, could simply be avoided if the Chinese people would depose and imprison every official of the Chinese Communist Party.

I am seriously considering going back to desktop computers
October 25, 2020 (comments)
Some rando is under the impression that there is a material difference in the engineering quality of laptop and desktop computer. Hackernews isn't, but they mostly fall into the same stupid false dichotomy. Hundreds of comments are mashed into keyboards debating the specific temperature and clock frequencies of processors on various computers. Nobody seems to realize that you're allowed to use both, even though a sizeable percentage of them already do.

How journalists use youtube-dl
October 26, 2020 (comments)
A lobbyist tries to respin a popular pornography-archiving tool as the bedrock of human freedom. Hackernews chimes in to report how important the porn tool is to police, which is the first time in my life I have even considered supporting an RIAA action. Hackernews makes a long list of reasons they might want to download a video from the internet, all of which boil down to "because I want to watch it" or "because I might eventually want to watch it." There is nothing interesting about this discussion, so there are only a few hundred comments, but the article defends their favorite pornography archiver, so there are over sixteen hundred votes for the story.

Google's new logos are bad
October 27, 2020 (comments)
A trash blog bikesheds some favicons. The article is so utterly devoid of insight or interest that I would be angry about the electricity wasted in displaying it. Since that power was renewably generated via solar panels, I must conclude that the dipshits who wrote, edited, and published this worthless drivel owe a refund to the Sun. Hackernews, however, is deeply moved by this piece, and is outraged that their telephone buttons are different colors than they were before. Some of the more devoted Google aficionados attempt to construct fanfiction to imbue these meaningless changes with deep import.

I Violated a Code of Conduct
October 28, 2020 (comments)
Some assholes bully a nerd over Zoom. Hackernews begins foaming at the mouth about codes of conduct, as usual, and immediately seize this example of a bad one poorly enforced to dunk on the entire concept of being held accountable by anyone for any purpose ever.

My Resignation from the Intercept
October 29, 2020 (comments)
Glenn Greenwald wigs completely the fuck out because some coworkers didn't like his ten-thousand-word thinkpiece about Hunter Biden chatlogs. Hackernews regards this as the death of journalism. They write fifteen hundred comments, almost all of which contain a very simple and easily-fixed reason that journalism has died. The rest are recommendations regarding which podcasts are the best ones to uncritically consume at face value.

From McDonald's to Google
October 30, 2020 (comments)
A computer nerd had a bad job, but now has a better job, and posts a story to that effect on "Hacker" "News". One Hackernews immediately demands answers regarding a perceived gap in this narrative résumé, so the computer nerd arrives in the comments to defend it. Later on, another subset of Hackernews get together to whine about companies' attempts to broaden their hiring demographics, since this is apparently some kind of threat to Hackernews.

Sean Connery has died
October 31, 2020 (comments)
A celebrity has died. Hackernews makes a list of everything the celebrity ever did. No technology is discussed.

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tedgould
27 days ago
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Web shit weekly is on fire this week. "Hackernews wrestles with their value judgments; their firm stance as bootlickers for megacorporations has finally crashed headlong into their equally firm belief that programmers should never be held to any legal or moral standards."
Texas, USA
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Why Younger Americans Don’t Vote More Often (*No, It’s Not Apathy)

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Why don’t more young people vote?

We often hear how younger people are apathetic toward politics or politically disengaged. And while it’s true that they tend to vote at lower rates than older Americans, apathy is just one piece of the puzzle for young people — and maybe not even the most important piece.

According to our new survey with Ipsos of more than 8,000 Americans, people between 18 and 34 are less likely to have faith in our political system. But when we asked why they hadn’t voted in the past, we found that younger people weren’t more likely than older people to say they didn’t vote because they think the system is too broken to be fixed by voting, or because all the candidates are the same, or because they don’t believe in voting.

That cynicism doesn’t seem to be motivating them to sit on the sidelines during elections. Instead, younger people are much more likely than older people to report that they or members of their household have experienced barriers to voting, which suggests that they may genuinely find it more difficult to cast a ballot. And that problem could be compounded this year given the extraordinary challenges of voting during a pandemic.

In our survey, almost one-quarter (22 percent) of young people said that when they didn’t end up casting a ballot, they had actually wanted to but couldn’t. As the chart below shows, young people are more likely to report that they or members of their household have experienced hurdles to voting — even though most have had far fewer elections to vote in. Young people, for instance, are much more likely to say they couldn’t get off work to vote, didn’t receive their ballot in time, missed the registration deadline or had trouble finding or accessing their polling place.

Take Jordan B., 23, a nursing student living in Savannah, Georgia. Due to a mixup when she renewed her driver’s license, Jordan’s voter registration reverted to her home county, which is more than 200 miles away. “I’ll probably just drive four hours to go vote,” she said. Jordan hasn’t had problems voting in the past but said some of her friends have run into issues with mail-in ballots this year. Despite the inconvenience of not being able to cast her ballot in Savannah this year, though, she said she’s going to make voting a priority, in part because she’s unhappy with how President Trump has handled the COVID-19 pandemic.

Like many other Americans, younger voters feel a sense of urgency around this election. Admittedly, they’re slightly less likely than older voters to say the outcome of the 2020 election really matters (75 percent compared with 91 percent of people 65 or over). But a high share (78 percent) of young people told us they’re planning to vote this year, although of course, the number who actually cast a ballot will almost certainly be lower.

That could be part of the reason why so many young people are turning out to vote early — and if turnout remains high among this group, that could be very good news for Joe Biden and Democratic candidates in general. In our poll, 53 percent of adults under 35 said they planned to support Biden, while only 24 percent said they planned to support Trump. (The rest were unsure.) In general, young people tend to be more Democratic-leaning than older people: Our survey found that 62 percent of adults under 35 identify as Democrats or lean toward the Democratic Party.

But young people aren’t necessarily that passionate about supporting Biden. He struggled with young voters in the primary, and several of our survey respondents told us in follow-up interviews that they’re still lukewarm about him. Kenneth Brant, 28, who lives in Florida and voted for Sen. Bernie Sanders in the primary, was initially unhappy when Biden won the nomination but says he’s more enthusiastic about him now. Still, however, he feels pretty “resigned” about his vote.

Brant wasn’t the only young voter we spoke with who was dissatisfied with his options, or politics more generally. Andrew B., 29, said he finds politics very frustrating, because people on opposite sides of the aisle won’t admit that anything their opponents have done is good. Briana Thompson, 26, feels disappointed with her voting choices. She told us that since she lives in South Carolina, a red state, she doesn’t expect her vote to matter, which is why she’s decided to vote for the Green Party candidate instead of Biden. Thompson feels that sends a stronger message than simply voting for Biden. “[With] each [election] I am increasingly more jaded,” she said.

Other voters, like Brant, who still plans to vote for one of the two major candidates, also approached the process itself with a heavy layer of cynicism. Even though he lives in a swing state, Brant told us he still doesn’t think it will make a difference. “Honestly, Florida has never had free and fair elections,” he said.

These kinds of attitudes were common among the young voters we spoke with. That’s one reason why — particularly considering the high barriers they typically face — young voter turnout might continue to ebb and flow, even if we see record-high turnout this year. And many young people will likely continue to feel disenchanted with politics, even if they keep casting a ballot.

We asked Brant whether he’ll keep voting in 2022 and 2024, even if Trump wins, and he responded with the verbal equivalent of a shrug. “Yeah, sure, my vote won’t matter for anything, but I’ll cast it to say that I cast it.”

Tony Chow contributed reporting.

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tedgould
29 days ago
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Polling of younger Americans on why they couldn't vote, seems like a good list of things to fix if we want Democracy to grow and flourish.
Texas, USA
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'Murder hornet': First nest found in US eradicated with vacuum hose

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The Asian giant hornets can wipe out a colony of honeybees in hours.
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tedgould
32 days ago
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I want to see an interview with the scientist who caught three wasps alive and tied tracking devices on them with dental floss. That is crazy.
Texas, USA
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